IS THE MORNING-AFTER PILL OK?

It was my understanding that Catholic authorities condemned use of the morning-after pill (Plan B contraceptive pill) because they considered it an abortofacient i.e. inducing abortion.

Not so, apparently, the Catholic bishops in Connecticutt. They have agreed to let the state’s Catholic hospitals abide by a new law requiring that the morning-after pill be available to the victims of rape. The new law requires a pregnancy test for rape victims prior to administering the pill but does not allow for an ovulation test. For two years the bishops fought for the ovulation test.

Finally, however, the bishops concluded that because of uncertainty about how the contraceptive works and about the effectiveness of these ovulation tests “to administer plan B pills without an ovulation test is not an intrinsically evil act.”

Bishop William Lord of Bridgeport explained: “What’s really at issue here is how much testing is appropriate to ensure that plan B does not induce the chemical abortion of fertilized ovum.”

The National Catholic Bioethics Centre issued a statement supporting the bishops’ decision.

Do you see anything morally wrong with using the morning-after pill?

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10 Comments »

  1. 1
    SUZANNE Says:

    Sheesh, Neil, you’re asking questions the answers to which are fairly predictable. It’s a bit like Question Period, when the question isn’t really a question but a statement.

    I’m confused as to how they would administer an ovluation test accurate enough to ensure no abortion takes place. That confuses me.

  2. 2

    Suzanne:
    Exactly. Your concern about how they would administer an ovulation test accurately enough to ensure no abortion takes place is one answer to the question.

  3. 3
    Chimera Says:

    What’s an ovulation test? And how long does it take for the results? The “morning after” pill sounds like something that ought to be taken immediately, does it not?

    This all comes back to the question of whether or not women have the right to control what happens to their own bodies. As soon as the people opposed to that idea are willing to take on the responsibilities that come with their opposition, the negotiations can begin. On a case-by-case basis only.

    In other words, if you can convince my sister not to have an abortion, you also have to assume responsibility for the product of her pregnancy. All responsibility. Financial, emotional, physical. Hey…you just got yourself a new kid or three!

    Otherwide, my sister wants you to know what you can do with your anti-choice ideas. Pass the Plan B, please.

    It’s also time for women to educate themselves about the alternatives to chemical abortifacients.

  4. 4
    Chimera Says:

    Er…the above was not aimed at any one person in particular, but all anti-choicers in general.

  5. 5
    SUZANNE Says:

    In other words, if you can convince my sister not to have an abortion, you also have to assume responsibility for the product of her pregnancy.

    It doesn’t work that way. No matter who convinces you of anything, you’re responsible for your own choices and their consequences.

    For instance, if I convince you to buy House A instead of House B, am I responsible if the house happens to be plagued with problems? No. I am not responsible for paying for the renovations for your house. You made the final call.

    It’s call personal responsibility.

    It’s also time for women to educate themselves about the alternatives to chemical abortifacients.

    That is an interesting suggestion. I am actually surprised more feminists don’t explore natural family planning. I wouldn’t expect them to reject contraception, but I would think knowing the cycles of your fertility would be empowering. I certainly think it is.

  6. 6
    Chimera Says:

    “It doesn’t work that way.”

    Oh, yes it does. In anyone’s life, personal responsibility means being allowed all the choices. If you’re going to eliminate any of the choices, then you have to take the responsibility.

    And I wasn’t talking about “natural family planning.” I was talking about the avoidance of refined chemicals. There are other methods of bringing on menses, if one knows where to find them.

  7. 7
    Paul Costopoulos Says:

    In 1967, at Man and His World, my mother in law, then pushing 80 and a devout Catholic, made me swallow my soup spoon at the Mexican restaurant. The Pope had just issued an Encyclical against contraception and abortion. She commented:” All those men regulating women should talk to us before writing anything. I would have told a few things to the pope about his document.” Cute isn’t it?

  8. 8
    SUZANNE Says:

    . In anyone’s life, personal responsibility means being allowed all the choices. If you’re going to eliminate any of the choices, then you have to take the responsibility.

    Well, you were talking about convincing your sister to have an abortion. That’s not about taking away a choice, but convincing someone their choice is wrong.

    Personal responsibility doesn’t necessarily mean being allowed choices. Some choices are just not responsable. The government can legitamitely eliminate those irresponsible choices.

    She commented:” All those men regulating women should talk to us before writing anything. I would have told a few things to the pope about his document.” Cute isn’t it?

    As a matter of fact they did. There was a commission on the issue. And the pope ignored it, because the people involved did not discuss the morality, just their everyday lives.

    I wish men would just stop trying to defend feminism as if they’re defending all women.

  9. 9
    Chimera Says:

    “Well, you were talking about convincing your sister to have an abortion.”

    I said no such thing.

    “Some choices are just not responsable. The government can legitamitely eliminate those irresponsible choices.”

    That is not within the mandate of the government.

    “I wish men would just stop trying to defend feminism as if they’re defending all women.”

    Got news for ya. You don’t speak for all women, either. You can only speak for yourself. I wish you would confine yourself to such when it come to making stupid, sweeping pronouncements about how one’s life should be lived.

    Paul: Your mother sounds like a gem! I probably would have loved talking to her!

  10. 10
    Mel Steffor Says:

    God talked to me and I am not a liar like Joseph Smith. Thanks Mel Steffor


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